PVHA 4-H

To Make the Best, Better

Because of the large range of ages we offer four levels. This gives every child the chance to experience working on and presenting a science project. All children 8 and under must participate at the Cloverbud level. Children ages 9 to 11 may choose to do Level I or II and children 13 and 14 may choose Level II or Level III. Choose the level that is a challenge to you but not too overwhelming.

There are two kinds of projects:

1. Exhibits include the use of models, a demonstration of a scientific process, or the development of a collection. Either method may be used to answer a question posed by your problem.

2. Problem Solving Projects involve the development of an experiment to actually test your hypothesis or educated guess which is made to answer a problem or question. A control must be used to prevent variables from interfering with the observed data.

Rules for all exhibits:

1. No harmful testing of animals.

2. No open flames or flammable materials in your presentation.

3. No danger to the public.

4. Maximum projects size is half a table and no taller that 2 above the height of the table.

5. Durable, free standing construction.

6. Reasonable cost.

7. Must be a current project.

8. One project per child.

9. Two children may work together to enter a group project.

Judging

Except for Cloverbuds, judging will be done according to the point system on the last page. Awards will be given according to the Danish System:

Blue ribbon means excellent project

Red ribbon means good project

White ribbon means project could use some improvement.

Every child receives a ribbon on their own merit. There is also an additional Judges' Award given out for one outstanding project in each level, except Cloverbud Level.

Cloverbud Level

1. Decide on your question or problem.

2. Research your topic in books or by talking to people.

3. Set up your experiment, build your model, or collect your collection.

4. Construct a display that will stand on a table or floor. ( A tri-fold board works well.) Prominently display your project's title and your name and age. Use other labels or pictures if they would help explain the project.

5. Be prepared to give a 1-2 minute oral explanation of your project or prepare a tape or digital recording of your explanation to play at the science fair. If you decide to use a tape or digital recording, you are responsible for providing your own tape or digital player.

The Cloverbud Level only will receive a ribbon for participation and judges will give positive comments on the child's work and how they may improve next time.

Juniors

Level 1

Ages: 9-11

1. Decide on your question or problem.

2. Research your topic in books or by talking to people.

3. Set up your experiment, build your model, or collect your collection.

4. Construct a display that will stand on a table or floor. ( A tri-fold board works well.) Prominently display your project's title and your name and age. Use other labels or pictures if they would help explain the project.

5. Be prepared to give a 1-2 minute oral explanation of your project or prepare a tape or digital recording of your explanation to play at the science fair. If you decide to use a tape or digital recording, you are responsible for providing your own tape or digital player.

Level 2

Ages: 9-14

1. Decide on your question to be investigated or problem to be solved by this project.

2. Research your topic. You should have at least three sources of information such as books, encyclopedia, interviews, museums, internet, etc.

3. Set up your experiment, build your model, or collect your collection.

4. Write a research report. The report should include:

    -Cover including project title and your name and age.

    -Introduction: Includes the problem and reason for choosing it and the hypothesis(if problem solving).

    -Background information that will help explain your observations, if needed.

    -Description of your experiment procedure and observations, or of your demonstration, model construction, or collection and those observations. This can include tables, charts, diagrams, drawings, or photographs, if needed.

    -Conclusion: Based on your background information, observations, or explanation of model or demonstration. Graphs, pictures, diagrams, etc. may be included.

    -List of resources.

    -Reports may be handwritten or typed. If parent types report, you must acknowledge that in the List of Resources

5 Construct a display:

    -Use 1 to 3 poster boards to make a free-standing display for the floor or table. Posters should include projects main points. Misspellings may lower the prize awarded.

    -Models, demonstrations, collections, testing apparatus, examples and handouts are placed in front of posters.

6. Be prepared to give a 2-3 minute oral presentation. Use your visual display to guide you to give an introduction of your problem and tell what you did. Be prepared to answer questions. Act enthusiastic and confident, speak clearly, present your information in an organized manner, and show off your new knowledge.

Teens

Level 3

Ages: 13-19

1. Decide on your question to be investigated or problem to be solved by this project. Read general information on your topic. Try to word your problem as exactly as possible.

2. Research your topic.

    -You should have at least five sources of information, only one of which should be an encyclopedia.

    -Write letters to sources of information, make phone calls, interview professionals in your topic area.

    -Keep a log of everything you do and the dates.

    -Write down all the information from your resources for a bibliography.

3. Write a research report. The report should include:

    -Cover including project title and your name.

    -Title Page with project title, name of student, age and date.

    -Introduction: Includes the problem and reason for choosing it and the hypothesis(if problem solving).

    -Background information that will help explain your observations.

    -Description of your experiment procedure and observations of your demonstration, model construction, or collection and those observations. This should be detailed and accompanied by tables, charts, diagrams, drawings, or photographs.

    -Detailed conclusions based upon these observations, background information, or explanation of model or demonstration. (If hypothesis is tested, its correctness must be analyzed based upon gathered, observed, and compressed data. Possible errors in data recording, uncontrolled variables, test construction, as well as ideas for future testing must be addressed. It's OK for your hypothesis to be wrong as long as you make an attempt to determine why.) Graphs, pictures, and detailed diagrams must be included.

    -Your opinion as to the value of this project.

    -Complete bibliography

    -Foot notes or end notes.

    -Reports may be handwritten, typed or computer printed. If a parent types your report, it must be acknowledged in your bibliography.

4. Development of the actual project.

    -Set up your experiment, build your model, collect your collection, or set up and practice your demonstration.

    -Construct a table or chart to record observations or continue to record in your logbook.

    -Take careful measurements and try to control as many variables as possible. Make sure observations are accurate, complete, and obtained safely.

    -If testing, run several tests or use a large number in your sample and compress data to obtain an average.

5 Construct a display:

    -Must have 3 posters which should allow observers to follow project's progress from left to right.

    -Display must be free-standing.

    -Posters must be neat, accurate, uncluttered and yet include the project's main points. Misspellings may lower the prize awarded.

    -Models, demonstrations, collections, testing apparatus, examples and handouts are placed in front of posters.

    -Project's catchy title and your name and age must be prominently displayed.

6. Oral presentation

    -Use your visual display to guide your oral report.

    -Include an introduction of your problem and explain what you did. Be prepared to answer in-depth questions on background and procedure. Act enthusiastic and confident, speak clearly, present your information in an organized manner, and show off your new knowledge.